Is there a parallel between Quantum Physics and Ideas?

Probability densities corresponding to the wavefunctions of an electron in a hydrogen atom possessing definite energy levels (increasing from the top of the image to the bottom: n = 1, 2, 3, ...) and angular momenta (increasing across from left to right: s, p, d, ...). Brighter areas correspond to higher probability density in a position measurement.

Probability densities corresponding to the wavefunctions of an electron in a hydrogen atom possessing definite energy levels (increasing from the top of the image to the bottom: n = 1, 2, 3, …) and angular momenta (increasing across from left to right: s, p, d, …). Brighter areas correspond to higher probability density in a position measurement.

In Quantum Physics a subatomic particle exist simultaneously everywhere until the time it is observed.  The particle is described by an infinite number of probability waves. The probability wave, or wavefunction (the mathematical function), provides information about the probability amplitude of position, momentum and other physical properties.

When the particle is observed (measured), these probability waves collapses into a superimposed concrete probability wave. Providing usable information, with known uncertainty.

Is there a parallel with how an idea forms in our conscious mind?
Advertisements

Innovation in children. Does our education system cultivate or destroy?

A 6 year old found it very difficult to concentrate in school except for in drawing lessons. The teacher was intrigued, so during the drawing lesson she went over to observe the child and asked
“What are you drawing?”
And the child said
“I am drawing a picture of God”
The teacher replied
“But no one knows what God looks like”
The child answered
“They will in a minute!”

Children are born with an extraordinary capacity of innovation, and creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson challenges the way we are educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our education system, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence. He says “all children have multiple types of intelligence and creativity should have an equal importance to literacy in our education and be treated with the same status”.

Further, children are less likely to be concerned about “getting it wrong” than adults and are therefore more open to “having a go” and trying different ideas.

Adults were taught in school that it is bad to be getting it wrong, and Companies are therefore following in the same path crippled by the stigma of “getting it wrong”.

Is it time for a change?